Women’s History Month: Before Rosa Parks There Was Claudette Colvin

Claudette Colvin was 15 in 1955. She may have been young, but she knew her constitutional rights, and on March 2 that year, she stood up for her rights on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama when she refused to give her seat to a white woman at the bus driver’s command. Two white officers dragged […]

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Lucille Bridges: Hero of School Desegregation

Lucille Commadore was born in Tylertown, Miss., on Aug. 12, 1934. Her parents, Curtis and Amy Commadore, were sharecroppers, and her mother worked as a housekeeper.  Lucille stopped attending school after the eighth grade so she could help them in the fields. In 1953, Lucille married Abon Bridges, a mechanic.  She gave birth to Ruby […]

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Facing the Details of Death: Covid Casualties Force Many to Realize the Myriad of End of Life Issues and Paperwork

Covid deaths are surging. We see the numbers increasing on the news.  Yet the realities of these numbers remain abstract until one has to deal with the loss of life of a loved one or severe illness themselves.  The details surrounding death are not familiar to most people outside the health profession.  We don’t have […]

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Osteoporosis Won’t Wait For COVID-19

Are you one of the many women across the country who is delaying health screenings due to the threat of COVID-19? Bone density screening may be one of those tests that seems insignificant during this challenging time. Osteoporosis is a condition that does not manifest symptoms until a fracture occurs. The testing to diagnose this […]

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World Osteoporosis Day October 20

You may not have been aware that October 20th is World Osteoporosis Day. What does this have to do with you?  You might be one of the 10 million Americans who have osteoporosis or one of another 44 million individuals with low bone density.  Both conditions increase the risk of a sustaining a broken bone […]

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The Realities of Human Trafficking

“There’s someone here!  Oh my God! They got Amanda!” It is every parent’s nightmare—their child snatched by kidnappers while they are powerless to stop them. It was also the plot of 2008’s Hollywood thriller, Taken. Brian Mills, played by Liam Neeson, listened helplessly over the phone as an international sex trafficking ring abducted his daughter […]

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Georgia Commission on Women’s Statement on Voter Access

Free and fair elections are the cornerstone of our democracy whose power is in the voices of its people at the ballot box. Citizens in many Georgia communities have faced prohibitively long lines, some several hours long, at polling places throughout the state in recent elections, particularly in the Atlanta area. Myriad explanations have been […]

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Georgia Commission on Women’s Statement in Support of HB 426

We watched in sadness and horror as a young unarmed black man was gunned down while jogging in a local neighborhood in Brunswick. Our hearts are broken for Ahmaud Arbery’s mother, his family, and friends, and we are angered that he was targeted, harassed, and murdered. We are angered that justice was slow in coming. […]

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Autism, Nick’s Ongoing Journey

By Commissioner Tena Blakey, Nick’s Sister On one cold rainy night at Hartsfield International Airport, I met my mom, stepfather and baby brother as they were coming out of the International Terminal. I was 25 years old and was/is very excited to be a big sister. You see, they had been in Russia for two […]

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Planning For Your (Or Your Parents’) Senior Years? Caring.com Can Help

In her book, They’re Your Parents, Too! How Siblings Can Survive Their Parents’ Aging Without Driving Each Other Crazy, Francine Russo calls it “the last transition of our first family.” It’s the time when families reconvene decades after the children left the nest to help aging parents navigate their senior years. If we are lucky, […]

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The Trailblazing Women of WWII

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